Wildflowers


Essay 'Gestures of Stone and Water: A Natural History of the Wenatchee Watershed' by Tim McNulty.
Twenty-three hand-colored flower etchings by Sarah Horowitz. Size 11.5 x 8" (11.5 x 16" open), edition of 40.
CONTACT me or Ken Shure to purchase a copy. Price $3200.


Wildflowers were drawn between March and May of 2016. The weather was unusually warm, and I scrambled to document and draw the flowers as they emerged. I took daily hikes to monitor for the new blooms. Wildflowers is a collection of plants native to Chelan County in central Washington State. Guidance in choosing flowers iconic to this area came from local botanists, naturalists and the Washington Native Plant Society. Twenty-­three plates were drawn, etched, printed, and hand-­colored by Sarah Horowitz at her studio in Peshastin, Washington. Art Larson of Horton Tank Graphics printed the Spectrum types onto paper hand-­made by Katie MacGregor. Claudia Cohen bound the edition.

From Tim McNulty’s essay:
"The craggy, windswept summit of Mount Stuart in Washington’s central Cascades feels like the top of the world. Granite walls plunge into glaciers and snowfields, and surrounding peaks fall away in a dizzying whirl. When the wind eases, the rush of meltwater streams thunders softly in canyons far below. For the Wenatchee watershed—nearly a million acres of converging ridges and flashing river canyons—9,415-foot Mount Stuart is the top of the world. From there, nearly fifty miles north to Chiwawa Mountain and half that distance southeast to Mission Ridge, a spectacular jumble of snowy peaks and ridges spills east in a grand gesture from Cascade crest to sagebrush steppe.”

Read the whole essay (pdf): Gestures of Stone and Water
Photography by Wiley Photography.